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Social Partners

Articles on the Social Partners.

New Icelandic employers' organisation while trade union chair resigns

It has been an eventful month for the Icelandic labour market. On the employer’s side, representatives of smaller companies formally founded a new association to further their interests, since they believe that they are not properly looked after elsewhere. At the same time, the chairman of one of the largest trade unions in the country resigned after accusations from union employees of bullying.

New Icelandic employers' organisation while trade union chair resigns - Read More…

Hadia Tajik, a trade union-supporting labour minister

Hadia Tajik, a trade union-supporting labour minister

Hadia Tajik, Norway's new Minister of Labour and Social Inclusion, is a strong defender of trade unions. She will be responsible for what the red-green coalition government calls a spring clean of the labour market.

Hadia Tajik, a trade union-supporting labour minister - Read More…

Collective agreement extensions – the second best alternative?

Collective agreement extensions – the second best alternative?

Why is there so much resistance in the Nordics against the EU Commission directive on minimum wages? The answer is that the countries believe they have a nearly perfect system of collective agreements, so why change something that works? In many European countries where the social partners are weaker, extensions of collective agreements form an important part of the wage model.

Collective agreement extensions – the second best alternative? - Read More…

"Important to continue the extension of collective agreements"

"Important to continue the extension of collective agreements"

Many workers enjoy improved conditions thanks to the extension of collective agreements. One leader of a trade union organising fisheries workers believes the solution must continue even though it is not a magic solution.

"Important to continue the extension of collective agreements" - Read More…

Labour shortages all around, including in the Danish film industry

Labour shortages all around, including in the Danish film industry

It is hard to find tradespeople who have time for new projects and the Danish film industry is short of everything from actors to scriptwriters. Businesses are asking the government for more foreign labour.

Labour shortages all around, including in the Danish film industry - Read More…

Why Iceland's wage increase outstrips the rest of Europe

In August, Iceland's monthly wage index increased by 0.3%. The index had then risen by 7.9% in the last 12 months, which is more than in most other European countries. The increase from the first to the second quarter of this year was 8.1%, the third-highest in Europe.

Why Iceland's wage increase outstrips the rest of Europe - Read More…

Has it become harder to govern the Nordics?

Has it become harder to govern the Nordics?

Three of the five Nordic countries are now run by minority governments. Does this mean the political pillar of the Nordic model has grown weaker? While the power of the major established parties is dwindling across the Nordics, trade unions and employers gather in ever-larger organisations.

Has it become harder to govern the Nordics? - Read More…

The social pillar strengthened after EU Porto summit

The social pillar strengthened after EU Porto summit

The EU’s informal summit in Porto, Portugal, on 7 - 8 May ended in a declaration which strengthens the social pillar’s importance in the Union. To the relief of Nordic member states, the introduction of statutory minimum wages was not mentioned in the final document.

The social pillar strengthened after EU Porto summit - Read More…

EU minimum wage directive: last stand for the Nordics?

EU minimum wage directive: last stand for the Nordics?

2021 looks set to be the year when the issue of statutory minimum wages in Europe will be settled. The debate has lasted a long time and opinions are divided, but on 28 October 2020, the EU Commission finally presented a proposed directive which will be processed by the European Council and the EU Parliament.

EU minimum wage directive: last stand for the Nordics? - Read More…

Yellow card from Sweden and Denmark to proposed minimum wages in the EU

Yellow card from Sweden and Denmark to proposed minimum wages in the EU

The Swedish and Danish parliaments want the EU Commission to withdraw the proposed directive on statutory minimum wages. Both parliaments have used the so-called yellow card procedure, arguing the proposal is in breach of the EU’s principle of subsidiarity.

Yellow card from Sweden and Denmark to proposed minimum wages in the EU - Read More…

What solidarity? Minimum wages split Nordic and EU unions

What solidarity? Minimum wages split Nordic and EU unions

The disagreement over the EU’s proposed directive on statutory minimum wages throws the issue of solidarity into focus. But it also highlights the alienation and poor pay and conditions found across many sectors in Europe.

What solidarity? Minimum wages split Nordic and EU unions - Read More…

Six MEPs' views on statutory minimum wages

The proposed directive on statutory minimum wages has still not been through the European Parliament. But just over one year ago, with a clear 422-131 majority, it called on the Commission to present a proposal to secure a fair minimum wage for all workers in the Union.

Six MEPs' views on statutory minimum wages - Read More…

Four researchers' take on the minimum wage

A positive move for low-income earners in Europe or the hollowing out of the Nordic collective agreement model? When researchers look at the EU’s proposed directive on statutory minimum wages, the analysis changes according to the area of research and perspectives.

Four researchers' take on the minimum wage - Read More…

Why minimum pay has become such a hot potato

Why do Finns trust that the proposed minimum wage directive will not harm their labour market model, while the Danes and Swedes have no faith in the European Commission’s assurances? And why is the debate so heated? There are several reasons.

Why minimum pay has become such a hot potato - Read More…

Swedish employment law – a drama with many acts

Swedish employment law – a drama with many acts

The rules covering the labour market still create heated debate in Swedish politics. Time and again, this issue has challenged the government’s survival. It also highlights disagreements between the governing Social Democrats and the Swedish Trade Union Confederation LO.

Swedish employment law – a drama with many acts - Read More…

Collective agreements important for people's trust in the future

It has been trying times for everyone participating in the Nordic exercise known as collective bargaining. The social partners deciding, between themselves, how wages should develop, is one of the pillars of the Nordic model.

Collective agreements important for people's trust in the future - Read More…

Finnish employers signal backtracking on wage agreements

Finnish employers signal backtracking on wage agreements

Not all businesses can afford to pay the agreed wage increases in Finland, warns the Federation of Finnish Technology Industries. Yet the trade unions will not tear up any collective agreements. The corona crisis rises many questions for Finnish labour market politics. Some say Finland’s competitiveness could be under threat. Employers argue the Prime Minister’s vision for six-hour days makes matters worse.

Finnish employers signal backtracking on wage agreements - Read More…

Collective bargaining with face masks

Nordic employers and trade unions have spent spring and summer in collective bargaining efforts, except in Sweden where negotiations have been postponed until 1 October because of the corona pandemic. How has sharply rising unemployment impacted on the process? Will certain groups, who have been working even harder during the crisis, get their reward?

Collective bargaining with face masks - Read More…

Hot spring and summer for Iceland’s collective bargaining

Hot spring and summer for Iceland’s collective bargaining

Iceland’s newly appointed state mediator Aðalsteinn Leifsson had no easy task when he started work on 1 April 2020. The corona pandemic had a brutal effect on Iceland’s economy. Challenging mediating tasks included wage negotiations for cabin crew, nurses and upper secondary school teachers.

Hot spring and summer for Iceland’s collective bargaining - Read More…

Susanna Gideonsson: We must defend the Swedish model

Susanna Gideonsson: We must defend the Swedish model

Swedish LO’s new President, Susanna Gideonsson, has deep roots in the trade union movement. At 16 she started getting engaged in work against unfair conditions at work, and now she represents 1.4 million LO members across 14 unions. Her current main challenge is to protect the Swedish model against political interference in labour law reform.

Susanna Gideonsson: We must defend the Swedish model - Read More…

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Social Partners in Scandinavian

Danish: arbejdsmarkedets parter

Norwegian: arbeidsmarkedets parter

Swedish: arbetsmarknadens parter

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