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Portable working hours

One in three Norwegian workers are contacted by work in their spare time once every week or more.Do we slave away until we drop because we have email on our smartphones, our home office comes with us on holiday and you and your job compete to have more friends on Facebook and Twitter? When the time for restitution ends up in a grey zone between work and leisure time, what does that do to us?
Work without boundaries can severely increase number of burnouts

Work without boundaries can severely increase number of burnouts

The borderline between work and leisure time is becoming fuzzy. It's getting increasingly difficult to achieve the old dream of eight hours' work, eight hours' off and eight hours' sleep when the smartphone wants your attention, colleagues work in other timezones and you need to work a night shift to get through your inbox.

Work without boundaries can severely increase number of burnouts - Read More…

Rocketing Finnish IT business: less bureaucracy saves our spare time

Rocketing Finnish IT business: less bureaucracy saves our spare time

Today's software businesses face demands for a shorter journey from idea to product and expectations of higher returns of investments. Finnish company Houston Inc. claims this can still be achieved with a 7.5 hour working day and a work tempo which won't lead to burnouts.

Rocketing Finnish IT business: less bureaucracy saves our spare time - Read More…

Online culture's effect on work-life balance

A working life without boundaries puts new demands on management, employers and unions. They all need to prevent workers slaving away until they drop.

Online culture's effect on work-life balance - Read More…

Racing against nature

Racing against nature

For two months every year John Johansen (45) works seven days a week, 14 hours a day. He'll drive 2,600 kilometres and count some 120,000 soon-to-be-born sheep. "I start in Rogaland on 12 January, then I drive to East-Norway and then north from there. I finish in Vardø on 14 March. By then I'll have performed ultrasound scans on some 50,000 sheep."

Racing against nature - Read More…

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