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You are here: Home i In Focus i In focus 2004 i Theme: Preparing for a future labour market

Theme: Preparing for a future labour market

Unemployment, gender segregation, early retirement, sick leave and lack of inclusion are key challenges to working life in the Nordic countries. What is needed to change this picture? How are governments and companies preparing for a future with a growing elderly population and fewer young people entering the labour market? Are there any signs of a more sustainable working life?
Finland's special commitment to disadvantaged jobseekers

Finland's special commitment to disadvantaged jobseekers

A Finnish pilot project providing special services for the long-term unemployed becomes permanent. An ambitious programme will establish 25 so-called employment service centres across the country. It is part of the government's ambition to create 100.000 new jobs during this parliamentary term.

Finland's special commitment to disadvantaged jobseekers - Read More…

Annette changes tack

Annette changes tack

Annette Pedersen decided she wanted to become an electrician. She simply changed tack to get out of unemployment.

Annette changes tack - Read More…

The best mix: old and young together

The best mix: old and young together

“We should look after our senior staff, but it is not our intention to turn Linjegods into a workplace exclusively for older workers. We must also attract the young, so that we get what we call a success mix of age groups, says Asbjørn Aanesen, who is organisational director at Linjegods. He is responsible for making as many staff as possible stay on in the distribution company – until they reach retirement age.

The best mix: old and young together - Read More…

Norwegians hard to convince they need to work after 62

To avoid a future total collapse in the Norwegian retirement system, more people have to work for longer. That is the main message from the Norwegian Pension Commission. But how realistic is it to expect those between 62 and 66 to continue working? And do employers really want them?

Norwegians hard to convince they need to work after 62 - Read More…

Scania: A health conscious company

"People who feel well are more creative and do a better job. The result is a win-win situation," says Gunnar Hedlund, head of the health and work environment unit at the Scania buss and truck- factory in Södertälje in Sweden.

Scania: A health conscious company - Read More…

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